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“Boarding” the Mentally Ill January 25, 2014

Posted by Crazy Mermaid in Involuntary Committment, Mental Hospital.
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An article Thursday January 23, 2014 about boarding at Evergreen Hospital in Kirkland, WA, gave me hope for the future of treatment of mental illness in hospital emergency rooms. .  http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2022721653_boardingupdatexml.html. I had my own horrific boarding experience with this hospital in May of 2008.

Boarding is the practice of “storing” someone in a mental illness crisis at the hospital while waiting for someone with a mental health background to do a diagnosis and  find treatment for the person in crisis. At the time, Evergreen had no one on staff to do the assessment, and it sounds like nothing has changed in the past 5 years.  This lack of staff caused major headache and expense to everyone involved.

When I went to the emergency room at Evergreen, not one person with a psychiatric background, except for the Designated Mental Health Professional (a King County employee) interviewed me during my crisis.  All the hospital personnel did was lock me in a white room by myself for hours.  They kept me locked up alone until the on-call DMHP arrived, which was approximately 7 hours after I got there.

After hours of isolation with no explanation about what was going on, I became more agitated, as anyone in my circumstances, mentally ill or not, would be.  Locked in a room, isolated, with no explanation about what was going on, my delusions and hallucinations got progressively worse. I started to believe they were irradiating me, with the intent of killing me. That was, in my mind, the explanation of why they didn’t feed me during my day-long stay.

After hours of contemplation, I finally thought of a plan to get out.  I got them to allow me to use the restroom, then broke away into the emergency waiting room yelling “fire” in an attempt at escape.  This effort failed miserably.

I understood my rights, and I knew they had no legal basis whatsoever at that point to hold me.  I refused to sign the paperwork that would have checked me into the hospital, and I knew they couldn’t legally check me in.  And yet they locked me in a room.  What was I supposed to do?

At that point, I had done nothing dangerous.  My only “crime” was thinking I was a mermaid, which was not a violent thought at all.  People don’t associate mermaids with aggression, and I didn’t give the hospital staff any reason to consider me dangerous.  Even taking my clothes off in the emergency room didn’t pose a threat to anyone.  It was a sign of poor judgment- nothing more.

It was only after I had been locked in that room for several hours, with no explanation about what was going on, that I decided to throw the furniture at the wall in a misguided attempt to gain my freedom.  Had I been given any kind of explanation by the staff, any communication by them, about what was going on, I probably wouldn’t have thrown the furniture at the wall.

At the point I threw the furniture at the wall, I was declared a danger, which was my ticket to involuntary commitment.  I could likely have avoided involuntary commitment had I been seen by a psychiatrist at the emergency room.  I would at least have had a chance.

Hopefully, with the changes Evergreen is being forced by the Federal Government to make, they will have a psychiatrist on staff to interview people in the middle of a psychotic episode, and treat them more humanely.

After the DMHP declared that I was to be involuntarily committed, which was about 6 pm, the hunt for a mental hospital bed was on.  In the meantime, I was kept locked in that white room, with no contact with the outside world, and with no explanation about what was happening.  They should have at least made an attempt to tell me the plan.

At about midnight, three people walked into my locked room with a red four point restraint board and directed me to “hop on”.  There were straps erupting from all directions on that board, and I knew instinctively that they were going to strap me down once my head hit the board.  So I refused to jump aboard.  Upon my refusal, two security guards came at me, one grabbing me by the throat and slamming my head down on the board. He choked me so hard that he cut off my air supply.  I screamed.  The other security guard buckled me into the restraint board.  After he finished, a nurse came at me with a syringe and plunged it into my thigh.

I woke up the following morning in a room with a bed bolted to the middle of the room, and no other furniture.  I had no idea where I was or what had happened.  As it turns out, I had been involuntarily committed to Fairfax Hospital in Kirkland.  Even when I found out where I was, I knew nothing about the hospital or the process of involuntary commitment.

With proper treatment from the emergency room, I believe this whole scenario could have been avoided.  I’m happy to see things might change for the next person having a psychotic break.

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Comments»

1. Terry - January 28, 2014

when you were at the facility and you looked to escape and yelled fire. Were you being told what to do by the voices you often refer to that you hear?

2. Grace Darling - April 10, 2014

Gee

Geez, I recently wigged out when having a CT scan and had been left alone in the room for 20 minutes after being told the scan would only take a ‘few minutes’. Just having somebody in my eyeline would have helped. Dehumanizing practices are rife, right throughout the whole of the medical profession. I sometimes think the modern psych wards and hospitals are more archaic than the asylums of the 19th century.


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